Stars and particles

The Universe is on show at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome from 27 October to 14 February

 

Light and elementary particles; the echo of remote events; the mysteries and secrets of space; and the sophisticated observatories scanning the depths of the Cosmos are all part of the voyage of discovery that is the "Stars and particles. The words of the Universe'' exhibition at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome from 27 October 2009 to 14 February 2010. The exhibition is organised by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, the National Institute of Astrophysics and the Italian Space Agency, with the scientific direction of Roberto Battiston.


Starting from the traces and the signals that continuously reach us from remote places in space and time, the exhibition recounts the great experiments, the telescopes and the detectors built in the most extreme environments on the planet to decode and interpret the words of the Universe. By means of an involving and captivating visual design, the visitors are led into the depths of the sea or deep inside mountains, and on to vast deserts studded with enormous telescopes. Also to space, where sophisticated observers orbit the Earth.

 

The exhibition is part of the calendar of events of the International Year of Astronomy, 400 years after Galileo Galilei's first observation of the sky using a telescope. Passing through the exhibition the visitor can learn about the work of the scientists who listen to and interpret the messages of the Cosmos to measure the dimensions and the age of the Universe and to study its composition, to imagine how it will evolve or to go back in time until the first moments of its life, even recreating them in a laboratory.

 

The scientists of today and of yesterday accompany the public who can discover what we still do not know; these are the great scientific questions of our time that researchers all over the world are trying to answer. And the questions that are still unanswered, the mysteries that have always fascinated people even when they only had their eyes to look towards the sky.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue, including a brief history of the Italian research bodies that study the physics of elementary particles, astrophysics and the space sciences and numerous interviews with Italian scientists at the frontiers of knowledge of the Universe.